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strange. never noticed a difference b4. how many miles??????? were they in the full 102k???which inj's came from which hole???????

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I think those look fine. I don't know why you will see a difference like that but I always thought they all look like that. There will be small differences inside an engine between the way they 'burn' from one cylinder to the next or even over all from one end of the engine to the other. I also wonder if there isn't a slight 'leak' in the sealing washers that could have caused some of the color changes we see here. I happen to know for sure there is a bit of a sealing washer leak in a few cylinders in my 1st gen (I can see the bubbles on the outside of the injector just above the hold down nut.). I think there is more of this that goes on in the world around us than what we sometimes ever notice!

But, for what it's worth: I think these look just fine and providing you weren't experiencing other symptoms and the engine was running good then I would think that would support this idea..... Hope that helps!

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Muddy, they were in the whole 102,000. I have no idea what holes they came out of because I had them changed out. I was experiencing bad mileage before I changed these. I have noticed an increase in my mileage over the weekend. I hand calculated 15 mpg before and 19mpg. now. That is still with hammering down several times! For some reason my overhead use to be off about 6mpg. over real calculated mpg. Now my overhead was reading 10 mpg. difference! Really don't understand why that has changed.

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Ok first off take the overhead computer and put a piece of duct tape over it and never look at it again. With the Quadzilla in place that number is totally wrong and never can be recalibrated.

Second if you can afford it pick up a ScanGauge II at a Autozone and hook it up and calibrate it. This will give you a accurate MPG number to work from.

As for the injectors they are burnt looking like the metal had been getting hot by blowby or something. The upper part of the nozzle should be dark color it should be a pretty silver / chrome color.

How did the pintle needles look?

Also got to ask what fuel additives are you using? (Be truthful about brand and quatity)

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The pintle needles look all the same, there is a good wear mark just up from the tip. I really don't now what else to look for on them. I have been mostly using Power service. And some others here and there but, for the most part it has all been Power Service.

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Ha ha ha I actually pulled/built those for ya. I'm sorry I didn't get a chance to test your old ones the way they were. Almost all the injectors we pull apart have some a bit darker than others. They've just been heated a bit differently. For example number 6 is probably going to be hotter than the rest just because of coolant flow.

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The reason they look burnt or got hot is because they have gotten hot. With pintle deviation and the fact that a VCO nozzle is not 100% efficient in how it seats or fires, is why some nozzles look worse than others. It also depends on the shims, the intermediate disc, spindle, return passage, and feed passage cleanliness as well. Also since 95% of injector companies don't properly lap the pintle into the nozzles they catch on the body creating excess heat in the nozzle. Also depends on the quality of the fuel you are running. I have a set of 5*0.014" with 0.012" lift that have under 1100 miles on them, and when I pulled them to check them the nozzles were starting to discolor. Same with the 5*0.020"s in the Corvette.

If you try to move thte pintle in the nozzles that are discolored I would bet they are "sticky" in movement compared to the non discolored nozzles. I have a box of old nozzles that show this, from 60,000 miles to 480,000 miles.

If you want them to look new I'll clean them up for free if you want to sell em. I generally scrap all stock nozzles.

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How would you go about lapping the pintle? I've been to Bosch training and am certified in CRI and CRIN injectors and I never heard about lapping the pintle (granted that is CR injectors not mech). As far as the internals of one mechanical injector causing more heat than another functioning injector I would assume it would be minimal especially considering its all in fuel unless you had something way out of whack which would most likely cause an injector to fail anyways. I have a big box of nozzles as well and the discoloration of nozzles doesn't really sway me either way as far as condemning them as bad (within reason) especially since usually a couple seconds with scotch bright will make them nice and shiny again. I deal with these little guys all day so that's why I’m so inquisitive. Maybe you can teach me something I don't know.

:rockin:

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How would you go about lapping the pintle? I've been to Bosch training and am certified in CRI and CRIN injectors and I never heard about lapping the pintle (granted that is CR injectors not mech). As far as the internals of one mechanical injector causing more heat than another functioning injector I would assume it would be minimal especially considering its all in fuel unless you had something way out of whack which would most likely cause an injector to fail anyways. I have a big box of nozzles as well and the discoloration of nozzles doesn't really sway me either way as far as condemning them as bad (within reason) especially since usually a couple seconds with scotch bright will make them nice and shiny again. I deal with these little guys all day so that's why I’m so inquisitive. Maybe you can teach me something I don't know.

:rockin:

I have no certificates for building injectors, I was trained by SMOKEM.

As far as the lapping the pintle in, I could tell you but would have to kill you.:lmao:

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I have no certificates for building injectors, I was trained by SMOKEM.

As far as the lapping the pintle in, I could tell you but would have to kill you.:lmao:

Ha ha fair enough I know a couple tricks if you can't find a new nozzle but I'm not a huge fan of them, but if you deal with Bosch you know how it is trying to get parts sometimes lol. In any case I'm glad your happy with your new sticks fxdriller. Oh and I agree with Moparman ditch that Power Service and get some Stanadyne!

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Ha ha fair enough I know a couple tricks if you can't find a new nozzle but I'm not a huge fan of them, but if you deal with Bosch you know how it is trying to get parts sometimes lol. In any case I'm glad your happy with your new sticks fxdriller. Oh and I agree with Moparman ditch that Power Service and get some Stanadyne!

Ditch both...:-?

http://articles.mopar1973man.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=68:hfrr-testing-of-common-diesel-fuel-additives&catid=36&Itemid=115

bosch-testing.jpg

I know that 2 cycle oil at 128:1 ratio is around 380-400 roughly...

Optilube is better...

Even better yet... B2 diesel...

Edited by Mopar1973Man

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