Jump to content
Summit

Blown head gasket pics

Recommended Posts

:( OUCH!!!!!!!!!!!!

not really though,,, i was pretty sure that those two cyl. were washed out and that i needed a new short block,,, it was bitter sweet to see that it was only a head gasket.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest 9812VCTD

I'm glad your cylinders didn't get hurt! Get that beast back into one piece I want a ride! :P:twisted:

Justin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey guys I need some help here, I have a 2006 5.9l cummins with 136,000 miles, around my engine I see some yellow not to sure what that meens I got some pictures, do I need my head gasket replaced? I doent see any oil leaking or any thing like that the engine is dry as thy come.

0413141953a.jpg

0413141953.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No I wouldn't worry about any of that. It just looks like a little bit of oil staining on the aluminum rocker box from slight oil seepage and heat over the miles. The only thing sealing there is an o-ring. You're cylinder head is the bottom where the injector lines thread in and the head gasket is between the head and the block.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To be safe, get a Blackstone oil analysis done ASAP.

Just because it's not leaking on the outside doesn't mean it's not leaking on the inside, and of the two its worse when it's inside.

By the way, how do you like the CFM+ intake horn?

-Kris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well guys I love the cfm+ paired with a Volant air intake and turbo silencer of man this thing sounds like a train I LOVE IT. I'm also new to the diesel trucks always wanted one though. So I decided to go with a mega cab. So if you use these commins as a daily when should I be expecting to change my head gaskets and bolts? I keep hearing with a 5.9l its about 200,000 miles don't know how true that statement is though. Any body have any ideas on that question?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cummins says that if you pull 80% of its hauling weight 20% of the time, it's about 420,000 miles.

Just make sure the valve lash is done every 100k and all the maintenance when it needs it (oil changes, filters, etc.) and they last damn near forever.

-Kris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Valve lash is the tiny space between the lifters and the valves.

Intake minimum is 6 thousands of an inch and exhaust minimum is 15 thousands of an inch.

Intake maximum is 15 thousands of and inch and exhaust maximum is 30 thousands of an inch.

There is a specific procedure to do this properly, so you'd have to look it up.

-Kris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:ok:http://articles.mopar1973man.com/3rd-generation-dodge-cummins/53-engine-system/120-valve-adjustment-and-verification

by Michael Nelson

Valve Adjustment And Verification

WARNING! To obtain accurate readings, valve lash measurements AND adjustments should only be performed when the engine coolant temperature is less than 60° C (140° F).

The 24–valve overhead system is a “low-maintenance” design. Routine adjustments are no longer necessary, however, measurement should still take place when trouble-shooting performance problems, or upon completion of a repair that includes removal and installation of the valve train components or injectors.

1. Disconnect battery negative cables.

2. Remove cylinder head cover (Refer to 9 - ENGINE/CYLINDER HEAD/CYLINDER HEAD COVER(S) - REMOVAL).

3. Using the crankshaft barring tool #7471–B, rotate crankshaft to align damper TDC mark to 12:00 o’clock position.

(a) If both number one cylinder rocker levers are loose, continue to next step.

(B) If both number one cylinders rocker levers are not loose, rotate crankshaft 360 degrees.

4. With the engine in this position, valve lash can be measured at the following rocker arms: INTAKE 1–2–4 / EXHAUST 1–3-5. Measure the valve lash by inserting a feeler gauge between the rocker arm socket and crosshead (Fig. 32). Refer to VALVE LASH LIMIT CHART for the correct specifications. If the measurement falls within the limits, adjustment/ resetting is not necessary. If measurement finds the lash outside of the limits, adjustment/resetting is required.

5. If adjustment/resetting is required, loosen the lock nut on rocker arms and turn the adjusting screw until the desired lash is obtained:

◾ INTAKE 0.254 mm (0.010 in.)

◾ EXHAUST 0.508 mm (0.020 in.)

Tighten the lock nut to 24 Nm (18 ft. lbs.) and re-check the valve lash.

6. Using the crankshaft barring tool, rotate the crankshaft one revolution (360°) to align the damper TDC mark to the 12 o’clock position.

7. With the engine in this position, valve lash can be measured at the remaining rocker arms: INTAKE 3–5–6 / EXHAUST 2–4–6. Use the same method as above for determining whether adjustment is necessary, and adjust those that are found to be outside of the limits.

8. Install the cylinder head cover (Refer to 9 - ENGINE/CYLINDER HEAD/CYLINDER HEAD COVER(S) - INSTALLATION).

9. Connect the battery negative cables.

Edited by MUDDY

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've always heard that as far as new head gaskets and bolts:

Keep the boost under 50 psi and you should never have to do any of this. Get it to boosting over 50 psi and you are simply living on borrowed time and it's not a question of 'IF' you have to but rather 'when' you will have to replace the head gasket and bolts to get a better / stronger seal so it won't blow it out again. It is sort of a 'racing' kind of thing honestly. Use it as a daily driver, with not too much more power and you should never have a problem. But it is fun over 50 psi of boost as well . . . . . . (Stock these have little problem reaching 30 psi!) And this is a case of: 'More is Funner'!! . . . . :popcorn:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(Oh: Should I mention -

These engines build about 400 psi just by compressing the air inside the cylinder when the piston comes up to the top of it's stroke. [Did you know that just this compression of the air in there raises the temperature of that air to at least 700F! That's how / why these are 'Compression Ignition Engines' as diesel will ignite over 500F!]

Then you are adding air pressure with the turbo so you are now starting that much over atmospheric pressure when the piston starts it's upward stroke.

And who knows what the pressure is in there when you inject fuel and it ignites and causes a very nice pressure spike in there to shove that piston back down to the bottom!!! This is where the fun comes from!!

Ever see the video of the injection event and the 'fire'? That's impressive!!) Science is awesome!! :popcorn:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's more like 38 to 42 psi of boost, and lots of folks recommend not going over 35 psi unless you've re-torqued the head bolts or replaced them with studs, and not going over 42 to 45 psi unless you're fire ringed.

I need to get a CFM+ for my '06 and add a boost gauge to it.

-Kris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
(Oh: Should I mention -

These engines build about 400 psi just by compressing the air inside the cylinder when the piston comes up to the top of it's stroke. [Did you know that just this compression of the air in there raises the temperature of that air to at least 700F! That's how / why these are 'Compression Ignition Engines' as diesel will ignite over 500F!]

Then you are adding air pressure with the turbo so you are now starting that much over atmospheric pressure when the piston starts it's upward stroke.

And who knows what the pressure is in there when you inject fuel and it ignites and causes a very nice pressure spike in there to shove that piston back down to the bottom!!! This is where the fun comes from!!

Ever see the video of the injection event and the 'fire'? That's impressive!!) Science is awesome!! :popcorn:

Now calculate the boost pressure on top of the compression ration and see what your compression pressure is after 20, 30 or 40 PSI of boost... Now that will shock you then figure out what the explosion pressure is and really get amazed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

30 PSI of air in a cylinder with 983cc capacity and a 16.5:1 compression ratio makes for around 800 degrees, considering the auto-ignition point of diesel is only 410 degrees.

*Note: we can't use flash point since this is considered to have an external source of ignition, like a spark. The auto-ignition point must be used instead since this is the temperature that a substance will ignite without the external ignition source like a spark or flame.

-Kris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now



  • Upcoming Events

    No upcoming events found
  • Recently Browsing

    No registered users viewing this page.

×