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Guest ShanesLB7

amp reducer??

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Guest ShanesLB7   
Guest ShanesLB7

Ok fellas... I got PIAA 5100 lights in my front bumper... They keep burning out... So I talked to PIAA and I have them wired through my factory wiring harness so when my fog lights are on they are all on... But the factory wiring harness and factory lights run off of himgh ampres... the PIAA's run off of low ampres so I need to find an amp reducer according to PIAA... I called NAPA they had no clue...

and ideas??

Also mad props to PIAA they sent me four new lights!!:thumbup:

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cagdodge    0

you might try just hooking up a relay to the piaa lights and use the factory harness to triger the switched side of the relay and then power them from the battery. that way the lights are running direct on the battery and your stock switch still turns them on and off

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Guest ShanesLB7   
Guest ShanesLB7

well if I remember correctly they wire up to the battery then have a ground and then to the factory wiring harnes... I am no electrical guru?? so thanks for the help and I am allready confused....:oops:

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lumpdog    0

Amp reducer.....I am not sure what that is?? And I really like wiring.....

To reduce amperage at any given voltage requires more resistance. More resistance means less voltage to the lamp, resulting in a dimmer light.

It is a simple ohm's law problem, you know, the ohms=voltage/induction

What they told you makes no sense to me. A light will only flow a given amount of amperage at a given voltage. So, if a light is designed for a 12v system, then you should have no problems. But if you take that same lamp to a 24v system, then the extra voltage will force more amperage, thus overheating and breaking the filament.

The relay as posted before would be the correct way to wire up the lights. If you ever need some wiring help, you could head my way, I am always ready to wire something up, although, I am OCD about wiring I think....:thumbup:

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Guest ShanesLB7   
Guest ShanesLB7
Amp reducer.....I am not sure what that is?? And I really like wiring.....

To reduce amperage at any given voltage requires more resistance. More resistance means less voltage to the lamp, resulting in a dimmer light.

It is a simple ohm's law problem, you know, the ohms=voltage/induction

What they told you makes no sense to me. A light will only flow a given amount of amperage at a given voltage. So, if a light is designed for a 12v system, then you should have no problems. But if you take that same lamp to a 24v system, then the extra voltage will force more amperage, thus overheating and breaking the filament.

The relay as posted before would be the correct way to wire up the lights. If you ever need some wiring help, you could head my way, I am always ready to wire something up, although, I am OCD about wiring I think....:thumbup:

are you goona be at the bomb party?? I got four more guages to wire up so I was thinking about pulling all my guages out and starting over... Feel like doing that???

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cagdodge    0

I think that amp reducer is the wrong way to go. It will reduce the voltage--according to piaa there lights work best at 13.2 volts. The most voltage you should even see at the battery with the truck running would be maybe 14 volts and that is with alot of things running and the alternator kicks up the voltage to keep the batteries charge and the electrical system running. usally it will be around 12.5 to 13 volts.

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cagdodge    0

also if you need i have the color codes for the wires at the ignition to make easier to tap for switched power for the guages-- i would also wire a relay on those so you don't put too much draw on that circuit.:thumbup:

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Snowman    0
Amp reducer.....I am not sure what that is?? And I really like wiring.....

To reduce amperage at any given voltage requires more resistance. More resistance means less voltage to the lamp, resulting in a dimmer light.

It is a simple ohm's law problem, you know, the ohms=voltage/induction

What they told you makes no sense to me. A light will only flow a given amount of amperage at a given voltage. So, if a light is designed for a 12v system, then you should have no problems. But if you take that same lamp to a 24v system, then the extra voltage will force more amperage, thus overheating and breaking the filament.

The relay as posted before would be the correct way to wire up the lights. If you ever need some wiring help, you could head my way, I am always ready to wire something up, although, I am OCD about wiring I think....:thumbup:

Im with Chris on this one. You can get a voltage regulator but that isn't what you need. I would call PIAA again and tell them that, that doesent make sence and maybe talk to some one else. And the most voltage that you should see is 14.2 to 13.5 and that should not hurt those lights. Do you have a Volt meter that will do dc just to see what your truck is charging at or have you seen any change in your guage?

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lumpdog    0
are you goona be at the bomb party?? I got four more guages to wire up so I was thinking about pulling all my guages out and starting over... Feel like doing that???

Won't be at this bomb party, wish I could be, but alas have way too many projects to complete this weekend. I haven't had a free weekend in months...

Just to clarify my earlier post a little bit. A relay is the correct way to wire up a high load circuit, but it will not reduce amperage. I really think you need to talk to someone else at PIAA, I can't imagine that your lights aren't designed to operate up to the 15v to 16v range for a protection factor. A normal automotive system usually charges between 13.5 to 14.7 volts when running. If your voltage is staying below that for any period of time, then your charging systems is not working to full potential (i.e. bad alternator, regulator, wiring, etc.) or the system is not large enough to handle power demands.

Using a capacitor in the circuit can help for the initial high load hit when turning the lights on. The initial fire of a filament requires a high amp draw for a split second to heat the element when it is cold. If your circuit cannot carry the initial load, then the light takes a split second longer to heat, thus running high amperage through for a bit longer, possible damaging parts besides the filament in the bulb. Capacitors store energy and release energy very quickly, and would help to light the filament quicker.

Here is a possible scenario, and now that I think about it, very likely:

You stated that your lights are hooked into the factory harness, which was only designed to handle the load of the factory lamps. PIAA's undoubtedly need more current to light them bright, and you may be limiting current by the way they are wired up, resulting in the explanation above.

The above is just a theory I thought of as I am trying to rationlize why PIAA would tell you to use an amp reducer.

Wow...too much to think about...can't believe I just wrote this.

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Guest ShanesLB7   
Guest ShanesLB7
Won't be at this bomb party, wish I could be, but alas have way too many projects to complete this weekend. I haven't had a free weekend in months...

Just to clarify my earlier post a little bit. A relay is the correct way to wire up a high load circuit, but it will not reduce amperage. I really think you need to talk to someone else at PIAA, I can't imagine that your lights aren't designed to operate up to the 15v to 16v range for a protection factor. A normal automotive system usually charges between 13.5 to 14.7 volts when running. If your voltage is staying below that for any period of time, then your charging systems is not working to full potential (i.e. bad alternator, regulator, wiring, etc.) or the system is not large enough to handle power demands.

Using a capacitor in the circuit can help for the initial high load hit when turning the lights on. The initial fire of a filament requires a high amp draw for a split second to heat the element when it is cold. If your circuit cannot carry the initial load, then the light takes a split second longer to heat, thus running high amperage through for a bit longer, possible damaging parts besides the filament in the bulb. Capacitors store energy and release energy very quickly, and would help to light the filament quicker.

Here is a possible scenario, and now that I think about it, very likely:

You stated that your lights are hooked into the factory harness, which was only designed to handle the load of the factory lamps. PIAA's undoubtedly need more current to light them bright, and you may be limiting current by the way they are wired up, resulting in the explanation above.

The above is just a theory I thought of as I am trying to rationlize why PIAA would tell you to use an amp reducer.

Wow...too much to think about...can't believe I just wrote this.

man I am confused as all get out... SOrry I am horribly at wiring... I might have to come up and spend a day with ya... of course when I get free time and you get it...:D

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Guest ShanesLB7   
Guest ShanesLB7

The only bad thing about calling PIAA is you talk to the same guy... I will try again monday and have the conversation with him again and see what the hell is up???

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Guest ShanesLB7   
Guest ShanesLB7
If you give me his number and a description of what is going on, I don't mind giving them a holler for you.

Hell yeah I will... I will have to go find it but I will pm it to ya...:thumbup:

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lumpdog    0
Hell yeah I will... I will have to go find it but I will pm it to ya...:thumbup:

Just be sure to pm me with all the details you can think of like:

How they are installed? How long have they been working? What are they wired with? What has gone wrong? ETC.

The more info you give me, the better off I can explain it to him. Since we are doing this third party, and I haven't seen your truck I need it all. Take pics of all the wiring if you can, so I can see as much as possible.

Then shoot me the info, and I will get to work..

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millco    7

Way to go! That is great help!!

Shane, if you want; come on over here and we'll get it lined out. I don't know if I have everything we would need or not. Give me a call tommorrow afternoon and we can try to figure out a game plan.

I think you guys are on the right track as to what is going on. Although, I would think using the factory system would limit voltage and current to the lights and just damage the factory wiring. Running the PIAA's at a lower voltage and amperage would not hurt them. They would be pretty dim though!

Putting them on relays should cure any problems you have had. You want to get power for high loads like that directly from the battery and 'switch' them with a high current switch like a relay. We would have to see what they draw for amps; but, I would think two relays for those four PIAA's would be about right. Then we would just need to get power from the battery to the relays and down to the lights. Then to fire the relays, tap into the factory system. I would suggest getting a plug from NAPA or AutoZone to hook into the OEM harness. That way you can just plug into where it hooked up to your factory driving light to get power for the relay. (A harness that has the same gender as a 9005 bulb. You will be basically plugging in 'wires' in place of the 9005 lamp). If you want them to stay on with high beams we will have to figure out something......

I'm sure between all of us we can burn your truck down comepletely.... I mean we should be able to fix you right up! (In a good way!)

Call me......

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millco    7

Hey, this is what it's all about! Sides, it's only fair: you all have helped me out a ton. Pretty fun really, when you can trade ideas and help back and forth like that. Sure beats taking her in 'there'.....

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