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4Play

A new injector seller?

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MUDDY    118

yes I can tell you about doc p and his products and way of doing business. I had purchased from him in the 90's for my vp truck.

 

from what I learned back then he is a crook. do a search on TDR for dr performance. pretty bad rep as being dishonest.

 

now CR injectors? I would love to see his work. if they are anything like what he offered for vp trucks back in the day and tried to offer for early CR trucks, and with his lying tactics, I would bet big bucks that these are a failure as well.

 

I will offer more input on this soon.

 

buyer beware!

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MUDDY    118

I will share more on the doc p fiasco later. I just wanted to share this:

yep, one must study and learn before making the purchase of something as important as injectors. and that goes extra for CR injectors due to the many complications of their function.for a worthwhile read check out this thread: http://www.cumminsforum.com/forum/3rd-gen-powertrain/2274930-who-use-injectors.html

 

many dishonest vendors are out there. also there are many who purchase uneducated or they shop by price alone. a mistake as this 03 guy finds out. follow this thread along and see how this vendor buries himself. thankfully some out there have some education and experience and will share. buyer beware. ask for specifics and educate yourself before writing a check!

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4Play    39

Kinda figured with a website like that.  Can't even figure out how I stumbled upon the page.  Without searching for it directly, I have a helluva time even coming up with it as a result.

 

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Mopar1973Man    383
Quote

 

WHY HASN'T THE PROBLEM BEEN SOLVED?

With older diesels it was simply all about air and fuel. Old school mechanics knew the fundamentals of diesel engines so it didn't matter if they worked on a tractor or a pickup... the basics of how the engine worked didn't change.

Today you have the addition of emission systems, dozens of electronic sensors, and multiple computers that control everything from your glow plugs to the transmission.

Today's dealership mechanics have to learn how to work on hundreds of models of gas and diesel vehicles at the same time. Even in the diesel world the manufacturers are making updates and changes to their engines yearly making it nearly impossible to keep up.

Because of this it is extremely hard to find a diesel mechanic that is specialized. If their expensive diagnostic equipment don't tell them what might be the problem all they have is a repair manual to guide them. They have lost the knowledge of learning to troubleshoot by knowing the fundamental workings of diesel engines.

The old school mechanic that you once knew and trusted to diagnose and repair your vehicle has become as rare as Bigfoot sightings.

 

5

 

LOL... We exist yet. We are plentiful but most people don't know where to look. Get off of CumminsForum and DieselStop you might finds us. I'm still doing diesel work for folks for the last 11 years. 

Quote

 

IT IS POSSIBLE:

All hope is not lost. There still is a few mechanics that specialize in today’s diesel engines. Mechanics that still posses the fundamental working knowledge of diesel engines. They have the knowledge to advise you on what is the most probably cause of your issue without ever hooking up a piece of diagnostic equipment.

You may not have that diesel specialist next door but wouldn't it be nice to be able to pick up the phone and talk to someone who can give you answers and a strategy to fix your issue.

Imagine walking into your local mechanic shop already knowing what the problem is. Instead of lacking knowledge and relying on the mechanic to find the problem... you hand him a list showing him where to look and what to fix.

Or... maybe having the “right” knowledge you can easily fix the issue yourself and save hundreds or thousands of dollars in shop fees.

 

 

This is why places like Idaho Turbo Diesels and Mopar1973Man exist is to help these folks find answers to their problems that are way better than the dealer that is going to charge huge hourly prices and use only dealer defective parts. 

 

Sorry, Dr. Performance... There are more solutions than you lead on too. Why we exist on the internet. 

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97cummins    40

I work in the trucking industry,and it amazies me how much diesels change every year.

They are no longer as simple as like when the 12valves came out. There are more sensors,more computers to check everything, more wiring. The emmisions systems has also changed so much. You have to constantlly keep up with traning to figure every thing out.

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Mopar1973Man    383

Still reading that thread and watching... 

 

A lot of hurt, bruised feelings in this thread. One of the few reason I don't bother with CF much anymore. The real information is intermixed with all the battling back and forth. The only factual person in the pile is Marin from BBI. So now you got a moderator that isn't moderating the thread nor cleaning it up or keeping it civil. Then you got the "Big Names" of the forums shooting their mouth off again with little factual information. 

 

Reminds me of the days of 2 cycle oil theory and the battles I went through... After all the long years of study and posting information, it became excepted. But I had my fair share of forum battles too. Again this why I'm not over at CF much any longer I just tired of the battles and lack of moderation by the staff. 

Edited by Mopar1973Man
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jamiesaun    7

I hear on a pretty consistent basis how the "computer" hooks into the car and tells you what to fix. My question would be what is this computer they speak of and where can I get one? The reality is nothing could be further from the truth. The techs that replace parts based on what the scanner says are low payed and low skilled. Find another shop. 

 

Though I will say that quality diag techs are as rare as hens teeth. Most techs are somewhere in the middle.

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Mopar1973Man    383
On 8/3/2017 at 8:57 PM, jamiesaun said:

My question would be what is this computer they speak of and where can I get one?

 

Most OBDII tools can do that exactly. The only difference like Dodge Dealer's user a DRBIII tool which does a bit more but most techs don't know how to properly use even that tool.

 

On 8/3/2017 at 8:57 PM, jamiesaun said:

The reality is nothing could be further from the truth. The techs that replace parts based on what the scanner says are low payed and low skilled. Find another shop. 

 

Even I work from a different aspect of diagnostic work. I work on a two smoking gun rule. Basically, I've got to perform two different tests that will fail out a device or part. 

 

On 8/3/2017 at 8:57 PM, jamiesaun said:

Though I will say that quality diag techs are as rare as hens teeth.

Some what true. Some of us are just plain hidden in the middle of Idaho. 

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jamiesaun    7

That's not what a scanner does. It simply tells you what code was flagged. Codes get flagged when a certain parameter or threshold was not reached. You still need to find why it wasn't reached. I use the data more than anything, it's invaluable for things like rich and lean codes, 02 codes and the most helpful of all, fuel trims. If you know what the parameters should be that is. If you don't, then the data isn't going to mean much.

 

For instance, no scanner will tell you a cam sensor is bad. It simply tells you the signal was not received by the pcm, and sometimes gives clues like circuit high or circuit low, but those are only clues after checking the schematic, since you need to know which side of the circuit the sensor is on before high or low will tell you anything. Could be either side if DC or could even be ac which is completely different. Sometimes the codes are inderectly related, meaning an effect, not a cause. And tons of jobs have no codes at all. I get those constantly. I've seen cam codes caused by a shorted crk sensor, with no codes for the crank sensor. I've seen bad pcms cause this, with the only symptom being a code for no cam signal. No to mention more wiring faults than I could ever hope to remember. With probably half already having a new sensor because somebody threw a sensor at it simply because the code was tripped.

 

Also, ya never know which ones are easy and which aren't. I just looked at a Forrester for an AC problem that is the most complicated circuit in recent memory. I probably spent two full hours just staring at the schematic trying to figure out exactly how this system worked. No codes, minimal bi directional control and exactly zero help from the scanner. That doesn't mean scanners don't help, of course they help, sometimes they help tremendously. But do the work for you? Not even close.

Edited by jamiesaun
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jamiesaun    7

Don't even get me started on network problems. The scanner does nothing if it can't communicate, only a lab scope is going to help. I've seen dozens of replaced modules that didn't fix the problem, all because a scanner wouldn't communicate with the module. When CAN was standardized in 08, it got somewhat easier. Here's to hoping Flex Ray makes it easier still, because network problems are always a nightmare.

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Mopar1973Man    383

Staying general speaking... If a code is tripped for the sensor you need to verify the +5V is present. The test the wiring from ECM to the sensor for 0 ohms, Then test the same wiring of infinite from the wire to ground to ensure there are no shorts to ground. Then it might be worth testing to see if the signal is intermittent or constant out of range. 

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jamiesaun    7
23 hours ago, jamiesaun said:

Yeah, resistance is definitely one way to go, not a bad way either. I much prefer voltage. It's just so much easier, and a little more definitive. Continuity/resistance works though.

 

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